JET Programme 20 Questions

Name: Karen

Prefecture Placement: Ibaraki Prefecture

Prefecture Requests: No Preference. I regretted this as soon as I had turned in the application, but by then, it was too late. If I had researched earlier, my requests would have been: Yamagata, Toyama, and Nagano.

Teaching Experience: 6 months teaching ESL to university students in Strasbourg, France; 6 months of volunteering in ESL classes for immigrants in Worcester, Massachusetts (while I was in university).

Number of Schools and Age Range: 4 senior high schools and 1 special education school. Students are 15-18 years old, although a few of the students who attend night classes are a little older.

School Level: all low-level (the majority of my students will not continue on to university)

Average Number of Classes per Day: overall, I average 3 classes a day, but having 2 classes or 4 classes per day are also common for me. It really depends on the school.

Closest JET to you distance wise: 30 minutes by train,  or 40 minutes by car.

Best part of the job: the people, by far. Students and coworkers both. I really enjoy the people I work with, and I wrote more about it in my post The Best Parts of Teaching ESL.

Worst part of the job: those one or two classes that are forever sleepy and unmotivated, no matter what fun lesson you throw at them. It’s pretty discouraging.  I wrote more about that in my post My Least Favorite Parts of Teaching ESL.

Best part of living in Japan: learning. I truly learn something new almost every day. Sometimes they are little things, like the kanji for sugar or a student’s dream job. Other days, I learn a little piece of a bigger puzzle, like the intricacies of the Japanese education system or a picture of life in Ibaraki in the 1950s and 1960s. I’ve met hundreds of new people and I love listening to the stories they tell. I’m also learning about myself: how I react to new challenges and what values I hold no matter the country or society I’m living in.

Worst part of living in Japan: the distance from friends and family. I’m rarely homesick, and of course distance is part of the package when you sign up to live and work abroad, but every so often an event back home makes me think, “God, I wish teleportation was real.” I’ve missed things—like my Grandma’s 90th birthday party and my friend’s engagement party—that I would have been there for had the distance been less (and plane tickets cheaper).

Favorite memory so far: 1) In the middle of a mild typhoon last August, a friend and I ran barefoot through the streets and to the park by my house. We sat on the swings, singing and laughing, for an hour in the pouring rain; we returned home soaked to the bone, dried off, and watched a movie with some hot tea. That afternoon was one of the first times in Japan that I wasn’t worrying about what other people were thinking about me “the foreigner”—I felt free. 2) Watching and cheering as two of my students competed in the All-Japan English speech competition in Tokyo, and cheering even harder as they both advanced to the semi-finals.

Hardest time so far: The car I bought from my predecessor is now 20 years old, and it’s needed a bit of work (I’ve replaced the tires, replaced the battery, etc.). All of that was fine, because my coworkers helped with translations at the car shop. However, last June, my car’s oil needed to be changed and I thought I could do it by myself. I wrote out a list of phrases with help from my coworkers, then drove to the shop and asked for an oil change. Yes, so independent. All was fine until the mechanics came back with a list of other problems they had encountered. I could barely understand what the problems were, I was upset that maybe the car shop was trying to rip me off, and all the repairs cost 4x the amount I had expected to pay. The mechanics insisted that all the problems were important to fix though, and since my car is so old, I worried and acquiesced. Even so, it was a frustrating and upsetting experience, and it made me feel like I’ll never be independent in Japan, at least not in regards to the bigger things.

What do you miss most about home? Here are 5: friends and family; ease of communicating with other people; book stores that sell English language books; good cheese at reasonable prices; and MY CAT!

What would you miss the most about Japan, if you left tomorrow? Again, here are 5: students, colleagues, and friends; ease of public transportation (trains!!); the little daily challenges / adventures that make me learn and grow; onsen (hot springs) and sento (bathhouses); and the FOOD!

One thing you wish you brought to Japan: newer suitcases with 4 wheels. The two suitcases I brought are 20-something years old, have two wheels, weigh 4 or 5 pounds each empty, and are a pain to travel with.

Something you brought, but wish you hadn’t: I packed pretty light, just clothes and electronics. The only thing I can think of are a pair of black high-heels (the ones I wore with my suit). I wore them for Tokyo orientation and never again. Maybe if I dressed up more often, or if I went to bars in Tokyo, I’d have a reason to wear them, but right now they are collecting dust in my closet.

Tip for living in Japan: imiwa? and GoogleTranslate apps. Both are lifesavers when it comes to Japanese. Also, the Yurekuru app for earthquake notifications, and Hyperdia for trains.

Tip for being a JET: don’t leave work the minute your contract says you can leave. Yes, high school JETs—at least in our prefecture—can technically go home at 4:15, and yes, you might not have a lot of actual work to do (especially in the first few months of the job), but once in a while, linger around the office for a bit longer and make yourself available to talk. The effect of this is two-fold: first, your Japanese coworkers will notice (approvingly) if you make a habit of staying a bit later, just as they will notice (perhaps a little disapprovingly) if you watch the clock and bolt out the door the second you are technically allowed to leave. Second, coworkers tend to be more relaxed and willing to talk after 5 o’clock strikes, and for me, this has led to friendships and an overall more fulfilling working experience. On Tuesdays, for an extreme example, I regularly stay at work until 7 p.m., chatting in a mish-mash of English and Japanese over tea with the nurse and principal of that school. Yes, that’s three hours past my working hours, but it’s only once a week and I feel more a part of that school because of it. On the other hand, I always leave work at 4:30 on Fridays, and I usually peace out of the office by 4:45 in the summer. It’s all about balance.

 

Anecdotes 5: An Impromptu Tea Ceremony

I was wrapping up at work yesterday, preparing to go home, when the energetic cooking teacher zoomed past my desk. Seconds later, she flew by again in the opposite direction. Her eyes caught mine, and after a brief conversation about why she was so stressed, she suddenly asked, “Do you have a few minutes?”

“Sure! How can I help?” I replied.

“Let’s have tea,” was her response, then she turned and was zipping back across the staff room. She returned with kinako-powdered walnuts.  “You like matcha, right?”

I followed here to the office kitchen, where she uncovered beautifully painted ceramic bowls, powdered matcha, and a set of tea whisks. She instructed me on how much powder to scoop into my bowl, and how to correctly whip up the hot tea so it froths. After a minute of preparation, we sat down to enjoy our own little office tea ceremony, complete with the kinako walnuts.

“I do this every day,” she confided in me. “It helps me relax.”

When the tea and sweets were gone, we cleaned up and she jumped into action once more. “Back to work, I have to prepare a morals lesson for tomorrow’s open house PTA day!” and she was racing off once more. The whole little tea ceremony had taken less than 10 minutes.

I love these little unexpected moments of happiness.

(Tuesday) Extracurriculars: United Nations University Global Seminar

Henceforth referred to as “UNUGS” or just “Global Seminar” for laziness reasons.

What it is: Global Seminar is a program for high-English-level high school students in Ibaraki Prefecture who have an interest in discussing world issues. Any 1st or 2nd grader from any high school in the prefecture can apply, but their English needs to be about EIKEN pre-2nd level, or they have to be super motivated, because it’s a pretty intense program. There are 6 full-day workshops spread out over the course of 5 months (October – February) and it culminates with the students visiting the United Nations University in Tokyo for two days to listen to grad students present on sustainability.

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(Monday) Office Life: The Best Moments of Teaching ESL

In the Office Life two weeks ago, I talked about 5 frustrating moments of teaching ESL here in Japan. However, the good always outweighs the bad (and if it doesn’t, you might consider switching jobs), so here are ten of my favorite moments of my job on the JET Program.

Be warned, I wrote entirely too much.

10. When a lesson 100% succeeds. This is one of my top favorite in-the-classroom moments. For a lesson to succeed so well, many factors are at play: the students must be in the right mood to learn, the game / activity must be interesting or helpful to them, and perhaps the stars must align. Voila! You have yourself an absolutely stellar class that will make you smile like an idiot for the rest of the day, and fuel you through two or three weeks of okay classes until the next big hit.

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(Monday) Office Life: The Most Difficult Moments of Teaching ESL

I love my job. I really, honestly do. But that doesn’t mean that it’s always easy.  Here are five of my… least favorite moments of teaching ESL in Japan.

  1. When a JTE (Japanese Teacher of English) says that they understand the lesson you planned…. then you get to class and realize the JTE has no idea and is giving the students false directions. This really isn’t frustrating – depending on the JTE, we usually laugh about it together – but it does confuse the students and waste some class time.
  1. When you and a JTE stare at a silly grammar point in the textbook and try to turn it into a reasonably fun activity for students. This can become a bit of a Mexican standoff. The JTE often expects us ALTs to be bursting with creative ideas. In turn, ALTs often expect JTEs to be full of activities from all their years of teaching experience. In reality, neither of us knows what to do with a textbook that wants students to use the infinitive to begin a sentence. Examples are “To see is to believe!” and “To hear him sing is an experience.” A long silence stretches as we both wrack our brains for activities. Eventually we scrape something decent together, and usually, the lesson ends up just fine. But those long moments of planning a lesson around silly grammar points are not my favorites!

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(Friday) Thoughts from Places: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

(Written Friday night, on the train between Yuki and Koga).

Last year, the choice to re-contract was easy, and no one was surprised that I wanted to stay for a second year.

This time around, I agonized for a bit about the decision. Was two years in Japan long enough? Would a third year be worth it? Have I accomplished everything that I wanted to do here? Should I start applying for new jobs back home? What is my future? WHAT SHOULD I DO?!

Yeah, I got a little dramatic there for a week or two.

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(Wednesday) Photo of the Week: School Festival

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School festivals are in the fall, so these two photos are a few months late, but I didn’t want to write a full post about it.

Basically, I just wanted to highlight my Commercial High School’s festival from back in October. I help run the English Club at that school, and the girls all worked hard to create a Harry Potter-themed quiz game for the festival. They decorated this science room and hid clues all around — inside the books and behind curtains — so guests could go on a little scavenger hunt to fill out the quiz. Guests who got all the answers correct won a small prize. Surprisingly, we had about 50 people complete the quiz, which surpassed all of our expectations!

Below are all the quiz questions in English. It’s not perfect English, but they tried really hard! Can you get all the answers correct?

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(Monday) Office Life: Foreign-Born Students in Japanese Schools

No, I’m not talking about international students who do a year abroad. I’m talking about students who moved with their families to Japan sometime when they were in Elementary school or Jr. High School, without ever having studied Japanese before.

One would think that this isn’t too much of a problem as Japan is a pretty homogeneous society — according to the census, 98.5% of the population is Japanese. However, my experience is different. My base school is a Flex school, which is a very special type of Japanese high school for many reasons. As the name suggests, it allows for flexible scheduling, and we have morning classes, afternoon classes, and night classes that run until 9 p.m.

One of the other things that makes my Flex school so unique is that it is much more diverse than a typical Japanese high school — I estimate that about 10 – 20 % of the students at my base school are not ethnically Japanese, and most of those students were born abroad.  The Philippines, Brazil, and Peru are definitely the most represented non-Japanese countries in our student body (probably in that order), although there are a handful of other students from various Southeast Asian countries like Vietnam.

Over the past year and a half, I’ve gotten to know a lot of these students (they tend to be stronger in English than their Japanese classmates, although that is not always true) and I have a few observations on the subject that I’d like to share.

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(Monday) Office Life: Inside a Japanese Teacher’s Room

One of the first things to know about Japanese schools is that the Teacher’s Room is the hub of activity. Every teacher has a desk in the Teacher’s Room—even the P.E. teachers, the school librarians, and the home economics teachers, although they probably don’t need one. Even the Vice Principal has a desk there. So if a teacher isn’t teaching or managing a club activity, he or she will probably be found in the Teacher’s Room (unless he or she popped out to the bank or the local Italian restaurant for lunch, of course).

This is in contrast to at least my high school in America, which seemed to lack a designated communal office—or perhaps it had one, but I didn’t know where it was and it probably wasn’t put to very much use. Instead, every teacher had their own classroom where they worked and taught and even ate lunch. So all the teachers are a little more isolated, at least to student’s perspective.

In this post, I’ll give you a little tour around the Teacher’s Room in Japanese high schools (aka where I desk-warm during school breaks).

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(Friday) Thoughts from Places: My Predecessor’s Shadow

I knew the name of my JET predecessor months before I was even accepted to the program in April of 2015. I had read intimate details of the little city-town I now call home — even glimpsed into the apartment in which I now reside — long before I found out where, in all of Japan, I would be living.

It wasn’t due to anything paranormal: my predecessor had a blog. And I was one of her readers.

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