10 Days in New Zealand: Our North Island NZ Road Trip Itinerary

New Zealand is the PERFECT place for a road trip. As promised, here is our itinerary, finally!

Due to budget and time restrictions, J and I only hit the North Island, but it was enough to sate our thirst for mountains and adventure… at least for a little while! We spent hours researching our trip (we have a 30-page google doc of notes and itineraries to prove it), and due to all of our research, we managed to see everything on our list.

I know I looked at plenty of online itineraries while planning our own, so if you are New Zealand dreaming on a bit of a budget and love mountains and adventure like we do, here is an idea of a successful road trip! Although I’m no expert, I included  few tips for budgeting in NZ at the end.

Day One:  Auckland – Hamilton

The Plan: This was our arrival day. We landed in Auckland at 9:55 AM, and spent a few hours going through immigration / picking up our rental car. By 12:30 PM, we wanted to be on the road, heading to Hamilton. We didn’t plan to do anything else on this day (after 17 hours of flying, we assumed we’d need a break) aside from shower and sleep.

What Happened: Our AirBnB hosts actually invited us to their granddaughter’s birthday party that evening, just hours after meeting them. Our hosts kindly drove us an hour further south to their son’s home, and we spent the evening with their family, enjoying a lamb roast, drinking wine, and playing games with the four grandchildren. It was an unexpectedly lovely first day.

Driving Time: 1 hour and 30 minutes. Accommodation: our Hamilton AirBnB.

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JET Programme 20 Questions

Name: Karen

Prefecture Placement: Ibaraki Prefecture

Prefecture Requests: No Preference. I regretted this as soon as I had turned in the application, but by then, it was too late. If I had researched earlier, my requests would have been: Yamagata, Toyama, and Nagano.

Teaching Experience: 6 months teaching ESL to university students in Strasbourg, France; 6 months of volunteering in ESL classes for immigrants in Worcester, Massachusetts (while I was in university).

Number of Schools and Age Range: 4 senior high schools and 1 special education school. Students are 15-18 years old, although a few of the students who attend night classes are a little older.

School Level: all low-level (the majority of my students will not continue on to university)

Average Number of Classes per Day: overall, I average 3 classes a day, but having 2 classes or 4 classes per day are also common for me. It really depends on the school.

Closest JET to you distance wise: 30 minutes by train,  or 40 minutes by car.

Best part of the job: the people, by far. Students and coworkers both. I really enjoy the people I work with, and I wrote more about it in my post The Best Parts of Teaching ESL.

Worst part of the job: those one or two classes that are forever sleepy and unmotivated, no matter what fun lesson you throw at them. It’s pretty discouraging.  I wrote more about that in my post My Least Favorite Parts of Teaching ESL.

Best part of living in Japan: learning. I truly learn something new almost every day. Sometimes they are little things, like the kanji for sugar or a student’s dream job. Other days, I learn a little piece of a bigger puzzle, like the intricacies of the Japanese education system or a picture of life in Ibaraki in the 1950s and 1960s. I’ve met hundreds of new people and I love listening to the stories they tell. I’m also learning about myself: how I react to new challenges and what values I hold no matter the country or society I’m living in.

Worst part of living in Japan: the distance from friends and family. I’m rarely homesick, and of course distance is part of the package when you sign up to live and work abroad, but every so often an event back home makes me think, “God, I wish teleportation was real.” I’ve missed things—like my Grandma’s 90th birthday party and my friend’s engagement party—that I would have been there for had the distance been less (and plane tickets cheaper).

Favorite memory so far: 1) In the middle of a mild typhoon last August, a friend and I ran barefoot through the streets and to the park by my house. We sat on the swings, singing and laughing, for an hour in the pouring rain; we returned home soaked to the bone, dried off, and watched a movie with some hot tea. That afternoon was one of the first times in Japan that I wasn’t worrying about what other people were thinking about me “the foreigner”—I felt free. 2) Watching and cheering as two of my students competed in the All-Japan English speech competition in Tokyo, and cheering even harder as they both advanced to the semi-finals.

Hardest time so far: The car I bought from my predecessor is now 20 years old, and it’s needed a bit of work (I’ve replaced the tires, replaced the battery, etc.). All of that was fine, because my coworkers helped with translations at the car shop. However, last June, my car’s oil needed to be changed and I thought I could do it by myself. I wrote out a list of phrases with help from my coworkers, then drove to the shop and asked for an oil change. Yes, so independent. All was fine until the mechanics came back with a list of other problems they had encountered. I could barely understand what the problems were, I was upset that maybe the car shop was trying to rip me off, and all the repairs cost 4x the amount I had expected to pay. The mechanics insisted that all the problems were important to fix though, and since my car is so old, I worried and acquiesced. Even so, it was a frustrating and upsetting experience, and it made me feel like I’ll never be independent in Japan, at least not in regards to the bigger things.

What do you miss most about home? Here are 5: friends and family; ease of communicating with other people; book stores that sell English language books; good cheese at reasonable prices; and MY CAT!

What would you miss the most about Japan, if you left tomorrow? Again, here are 5: students, colleagues, and friends; ease of public transportation (trains!!); the little daily challenges / adventures that make me learn and grow; onsen (hot springs) and sento (bathhouses); and the FOOD!

One thing you wish you brought to Japan: newer suitcases with 4 wheels. The two suitcases I brought are 20-something years old, have two wheels, weigh 4 or 5 pounds each empty, and are a pain to travel with.

Something you brought, but wish you hadn’t: I packed pretty light, just clothes and electronics. The only thing I can think of are a pair of black high-heels (the ones I wore with my suit). I wore them for Tokyo orientation and never again. Maybe if I dressed up more often, or if I went to bars in Tokyo, I’d have a reason to wear them, but right now they are collecting dust in my closet.

Tip for living in Japan: imiwa? and GoogleTranslate apps. Both are lifesavers when it comes to Japanese. Also, the Yurekuru app for earthquake notifications, and Hyperdia for trains.

Tip for being a JET: don’t leave work the minute your contract says you can leave. Yes, high school JETs—at least in our prefecture—can technically go home at 4:15, and yes, you might not have a lot of actual work to do (especially in the first few months of the job), but once in a while, linger around the office for a bit longer and make yourself available to talk. The effect of this is two-fold: first, your Japanese coworkers will notice (approvingly) if you make a habit of staying a bit later, just as they will notice (perhaps a little disapprovingly) if you watch the clock and bolt out the door the second you are technically allowed to leave. Second, coworkers tend to be more relaxed and willing to talk after 5 o’clock strikes, and for me, this has led to friendships and an overall more fulfilling working experience. On Tuesdays, for an extreme example, I regularly stay at work until 7 p.m., chatting in a mish-mash of English and Japanese over tea with the nurse and principal of that school. Yes, that’s three hours past my working hours, but it’s only once a week and I feel more a part of that school because of it. On the other hand, I always leave work at 4:30 on Fridays, and I usually peace out of the office by 4:45 in the summer. It’s all about balance.