Chicken Hearts and Yuzu; First-time Foods in Japan

I wasn’t an especially picky eater before arriving in Japan… although, nor was I a particularly adventurous eater. But when you move to a new country, being even slightly picky goes out the window. Whether you want to or not, you’ll face some very new foods. They’ll become foes, or new favorites — the choice is yours.

Just for fun, here’s a list of foods that I’ve eaten for the first time while living in Japan, most of which I really like, and three of which I really…don’t…

Raw fish – I don’t go out of my way to eat sashimi or sushi, but I also don’t have to. Because of drinking parties with coworkers or cheap conveyor-belt sushi dinners with friends, I seem to eat raw fish about once a week, whether I want it or not. After all these months, though, I can finally face raw fish without dread! Tuna and Yellowtail are my favorites.

IMG_1317

Raw fish, raw shrimp, fish eggs…. facing all my previous fears at once!

Raw shrimp – I try to avoid raw shrimp. It tastes so much better cooked!

Raw squid – Personally, I think that raw squid is probably the worst thing on this list. The texture of raw squid is awful, and I have a really difficult time even forcing myself to eat it.

Fish eggs – I dreaded fish eggs until I actually tried them… they’re good, but interesting.

Continue reading

Advertisements

My Results from the Kanto Region’s 2016 Kimono Competition

At my community Japanese class yesterday evening, my teacher, Y-sensei, greeted me with a cry of “What was your time in the competition?”

Every Wednesday since the beginning of September, Y-sensei and I have discussed my upcoming kimono competition during our classes (in my broken Japanese, and in her broken English).  We had particularly discussed the time limit, because for a while, I had a hard time staying under seven minutes. So naturally, she wanted to know if I had beaten the clock… and, of course, if I was going to Tokyo for the All-Japan Competition.

Last night, my answer to both of these questions was…

Continue reading